Performance/Happening (citations)

Publié le par Olivier Lussac

Marina Abramovic & Ulay

« Pour les performances, il y a chaque fois plusieurs étapes. D’abord, vient l’idée. Puis commencent les préparatifs, il faut trouver l’espace, se renseigner sur les conditions techniques, les possibilités d’enregistrement de la performance, etc., tout ce qu’il faut pour réaliser le projet. Une fois fixés le moment et le lieu, nous commençons à vraiment nous glisser dans l’état mental et physique de la performance envisagée, et partons très logiquement du principe de donner corps à notre idée. Mais après ce début rationnel, arrive l’instant où on commence à être sa propre oeuvre, où il y a identification totale avec l’idée de l’oeuvre et, en même temps, de moins en moins de préméditation et de maîtrise raisonnée : c’est une sorte de situation où on ne se rappelle plus ensuite ce qui s’est passé. A ce moment-là, on fait strictement ce qu’on est en train de faire, mais sans réfléchir, sans plus aucune distance avec son idée. Et c’est très bizarre... je ne peux pas en parler. Nous arrivons à la fin et cette fin est toujours différente pour chacun de nous, elle est complètement modulable et personnelle. »

(Vienne, le 15 avril 1978. Extrait d’une conversation entre Marina Abramovic, Ulay et Heidi Grundmann)

 

« Toutes nos interventions ont une espèce de caractère concret, elles sont très simples, elles n’expliquent jamais rien, elles ne sont pas théoriques, ce sont des interventions où je peux dire que je marche vers le mur, que je touche le mur, que mon corps se cogne au mur, c’est mon rôle, celui d’Ulay est de se précipiter sur le mur, de le toucher, de le cogner, pareil… nous commençons dans une espèce de similitude synchronisée, nous pouvons dire cela raisonnablement au début… et puis nous arrivons au stade où chacun de nous fonctionne seul. A cet instant, il n’y a plus de contact, même dans une performance comme celle des « cheveux », à cet instant, au bout de sept à dix heures, le rapport avec les cheveux existe plastiquement, les deux corps faisant la même chose, mais au-dedans il y a une séparation… ; et après la performance, on est complètement vidés, sans aucun sentiment, absolument loin de tout et quand on se retrouve devant la vidéo, les photographies, il manque toujours quelque chose, aucune forme de témoignage ne peut rendre l’émotion qu’il y avait là-dedans, parce qu’elle est impossible à décrire, elle est si spontanée, dans les documents il manque l’intensité, l’émotion. Et je crois que c’est pour ça que la performance est une chose aussi bizarre, la performance qu’on a fait à un moment déterminé. Dans ce moment, on voit tout le mécanisme, en même temps on voit disparaître le mécanisme et après on n’a rien, juste le souvenir. »

(Vienne, le 15 avril 1978. Extrait d’une conversation entre Marina Abramovic, Ulay et Heidi Grundmann)

 

« Pour être une performance artist, il faut haïr le théâtre. Le théâtre est faux; il y a une boîte noire, vous payez votre ticket et vous vous asseyez dans le noir et vous voyez quelqu’un jouer la vie de quelqu’un d’autre. Le couteau n’est pas réel, le sang n’est pas réel et les émotions ne sont pas réelles. La performance, c’est exactement le contraire : le couteau est réel, le sang est réel, et les émotions sont réelles. C’est un concept très différent. C’est à propos de la vraie réalité. »

(The Guardian, 20 juillet 2010 propos rapportés par Chris Wilkinson, « entretien de Robert Ayers avec Marina Abramovic », repris par Christian Biet, « Pour une extension du domaine de la performance (XVIIe-XXIe siècle) », revue Communications, n° 92 « Performance », 2013, Paris, Seuil, p. 34)

 

(Sandy Ballatore : « Kaprow’s booklet and films, as he explains it, “were made and assembled to illustrate a framework of moves upon which an action or set of actions could be based. They function somewhere between the artifice of a Hollywood movie and an instruction manual. The pictures explain the words and the words explain the pictures. Thus the conversion of an event into an exhibit or magazine article becomes a species mythology. »

(Sandy Ballatore, « The ‘Un-Artist’ Observed », Artweek, v.7, March 13, 1976, pp.1,16. Review of an exhibition at Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art in which Kaprow’s works reveal recent ‘activities’; included, Pasteups for 5 Booklets (done between 1973-76), a videotape and 2 films (Routine and Warm-Ups).

 

(Mirella Bandini : « Kaprow, for example, in talking about the birth of his first happening, states that he moves on from his first paintings and assemblages, done in 1952, to a sort of agglomeration of action-collage and finally to their structural arrangement in environments with sounds and lights; and he at once realised that « every visitor became a part of it, which, to tell the truth, I hadn’t expected. So I entrusted those who came in with unimportant duties, like moving something, turning on switches, etc. Towards ‘57-’58 this need grew more intense and prompted me to attribute an increasingly marked responsability to the visitor, whom I entrusted with more and more things to do. So the happening was born. My first happenings were staged in quite different kinds of places: attics, shops, classroom, gymnasiums, on a friend’s (George Segal) farm, and so on. The combining of all the elements in my work – compositions, environment, time, space and people – was my biggest technical problem right from the start… Most of all, I wanted the audience not so much to watch, but to ‘take part’ in my work, and I had to find a practical way of accomplishing this aim. So I devised a system of very simple situations and images, with elementary mechanisms and implications… I generally elaborated my works on the basis of four points:

I) the action’s simple or complex ‘being’, that’s to say, without any other meaning beyond the physical and sensitive immediacy of whatever happens. II) The actions are fantasies carried out not exactly in the model of life, though they are derived from it. III) The actions constitute an organised structure of events. IV) Their ‘meaning’ is readable in a symbolic and allusive sense. » (Allan Kaprow)

[Bandini]: Since 1965, or since ‘Calling,’ to be precise, the number of people taking part in your happenings has grown steadily smaller, with the exclusion of spectators. What determined this new position?

[Kaprow]: In the beginning, because I wasn’t a professional actor and nor were my friends, I was looking for an experience similar to that of actors so that I could really try out this unknown dimension to me. This was the reason why the people were involved in an almost theatrical way. But as soon as I experienced this I stopped moving in that direction. I just gave very objective direction-notes as coldly and flatly as possible, leaving you with the fullest scope for action.

[Bandini]: However, in this way participation in your events becomes an aleatory thing.

[Kaprow]: No, it implies no kind of superiority over anybody. Besides, our knowledge and yours was left to chance. This position of freedom is important. You were absolutely free to put on the piece, in that it is a proposal which the participants could perfectly well refuse if they wished. So these efforts of mine to research certain aspects of human institutions are experiments on a minor scale, which could however be done on larger one. After the sixties my happenings stopped being a large scale and became steadily smaller and more intimate. Maybe it’s the effect of the times. Certainly, after ‘68, which we all learnt something from, one is more inclined towards a more inward-looking dimension. This doesn’t upset the research in the slightest, because it is simply the study of models that can later be blown up again on a larger scale as soon as the occasion arises and the situation is riper.

Occasionnaly I can call what I do ‘art,’ but I can also say that it is a form of sociology and has a psychodynamic aspect. »

(Mirella Bandini, « Allan Kaprow: A Happening and a Conversation with Allan Kaprow, » DATA, nos.16/17, June/August 1975, pp.60-67 and insert. History of the happening – past and present. Includes photos of happening events from early 1960’s. Text in Italian with an English translation by Rodney Stringer. Excerpts.)

 

(Bruce Barber : « To my mind “the limits“ as Kirby prefers to call them, have still not been determined. This is what makes classification at he present time so difficult. The examples from the Art Index system previously given reveal how easily, on the official level at least, performance can bleed into other categories and vice versa. It is perhaps in the very nature of the word ‘performance’ that this be so, at least until the term becomes so convenient and ‘catch-all’, like the word Happening, that it ceases to have any other than a specific historical relevance. Viz. Performance in New York meant such and such to this particular group of people within this limited period of time. In fact the word performance is not like the word happening. It has been appropriated rather than coined and has therefore already been honed down by its users to accomodate what they wish it to mean. This might sound surprising, yet I would contend that it is (or was) less open to abuse from the very start of its existence as an art term than Happening ever was. As a word with already a great deal of currency in the vernacular it is less likely to be appropriated by the world of advertising than say Pop Art – Body Art, Body Language. But then it’s more likely to be open to abuse in the art world – of the kind that the term alienation has had in the world of sociology and philosophy. »

(Bruce Barber, « The Terms: Limits to Performance? », Centerfold, v.2, September 1978, pp. 96-100. An excerpt from an essay entitled ‘Problems in the Taxonomy of Performance and Body Art’, (1977).)

 

(Roland Barthes : « Quel est le contenu du message photographique ? Qu’est-ce que la photographie transmet ? Par définition, la scène elle-même, le réel littéral. […] certes l’image n’est pas le réel ; mais elle en est du moins l’analogon parfait, et c’est précisément cette perfection analogique qui, devant le sens commun, définit la photographie. »

(Roland Barthes, « Le Message photographique », revue Communications, 1961, in L’Obvie et l’obtus. Essais critique III, 1982, p. 10-11)

 

(Gregory Battcock : « Before man was aware of art he was aware of himself. Awareness of the person is, then, the first art. In performance art the figure of the artist is the tool for the art. It is the art. »

(Gregory Battcock, « L’art corporel », catalogue The Art of performance (Venise, Palais Grassi, 1979, non paginé)

 

(Nathalie Boulouch & Elvan Zabunyan : « Alors qu’elle interagit dès les années 60 avec les autres arts de la scène – théâtre, danse, musique –, la performance accède à un statut hybride lorsqu’elle se déplace dans le monde des arts plastiques et visuels. Ce déplacement correspond aussi au moment où, paradoxalement, les artistes ne sont pas nécessairement à la recherche d’un public pour faire exister leur action. Certaines artistes s’isolent dans leur atelier et font leur performance de façon solitaire. Joan Jonas, Yvonne Rainer, Carolee Schneemann, Martha Rosler évoquent, toutes, les événements spontanés, les improvisations réalisées devant un groupe d’amis. L’espace de la performance reste parfois plus quer confidentiel et c’est le plus souvent la photographie, si l’artiste décide de l’intégrer, qui permet de sauvegarder des traces. »

(Nathalie Boulouch & Elvan Zabunyan, « Introduction », in Janig Bégoc, Nathalie Boulouch & Elvan Zabunyan, La Performance. Entre archives et pratiques contemporaines, Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes & Archives de la critique d’art, 2010, p. 20-21) 

 

(Pierre Bourdieu : « Si la photographie est considérée comme un enregistrement parfaitement réaliste et objectif du monde visible, c’est qu’on lui a assigné (dès l’origine) des usages sociaux tenus pour ‘‘réalistes’’ et ‘‘objectifs’’. »

(Pierre Bourdieu, « La définition sociale de la photographie », Un art moyen, Paris, Éditions de Minuit, 1965, p. 108-109.)

 

(George Brecht : « Je ne pense pas qu’il y ait une différence entre le théâtre ou n’importe quel autre geste que je fais. »

(George Brecht, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(Claus Bremer : « Il permet de faire passer au spectateur le stade de la réceptivité pure pour l’aider à façonner lui-même non seulement le spectacle, mais aussi les contingences de la ve quotidienne. »

(Claus Bremer, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(Jack Burnham : « The erosion in the plastic arts toward theater was in progress early in the beginning of this century, though never so evident as when critics began to describe in detail the activities of Pollock and de Kooning in front of or over a canvas. » He concluded : «  For a century the artist has chosen to be not only the best subject matter, but in many cases his only legitimate subject. »

(Jack Burnham, « Object and ritual : Towards a Working Ontology of Art », Arts 47, no. 3 (december-january 1973), p. 30.)

 

(Scott Burton : « As anyone who follows any of the performing arts more than briefly understands, the artist’s own body is not an enduring material. Artists like Nauman or Robert Morris, in his box with photograph of his nude self, begin to blur the traditionnal distinction between performing and producing arts ; that is, between art as service and art as object. If a work of plastic art can exist as a gesture (and not just as the result of a gesture) then critics of the most recent art are right to feel treatened by the ‘theatricality’ of temporalized work. The chief characteristic of the performance is that, after it is completed, there is nothing left to quantify. The witness is forced to examine his own impressions and thus his own psyche instead of being able to pretend to a formal objectivity. » 

(Scott Burton, « Time on Their Hands : Summer Exhibitions at the Whitney and the Guggenheim », Art News, v.68, Summer 1969, pp. 42-43. Article discusses artists during Summer 1970 at the Guggenheim and Whitney ; includes Bruce Nauman. Excerpt.)

 

(John Cage : « Je voudrais que l’on puisse considérer la vie de tous les jours comme du théâtre. »

(John Cage, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(Daniel Charles : « La problématique de la performance dans la culture postmoderne recouvrait aussi bien le shamanisme que les « projections » (c’était le mot d’Olson) du « drame humain se jouant dans un univers en expansion ». L’intitulé de la présentation de Benamou : « La présence et le jeu « (Presence and Play), mettait l’accent sur l’interstice entre présence et représentation, entre être et absence ; et si la performance – « le mode d’unification du postmoderne « – était tout ce qui importait aujourd’hui, c’était parce  que, du Living Theater à la vidéo, elle avait métamorphosé la scène des arts, « de la peinture (depuis Duchamp), du théâtre (depuis Artaud), de la poésie (depuis Olson). « Comment cerner ce changement ? »

(Daniel Charles, La Fiction de la Postmodernité selon l’esprit de la musique, Paris, PUF, Thémis-Philosophie, 2001, p. 24.)

 

(Giuseppe Chiari : « Qu’est-ce qu’un happening ? Assumer un acte qui s’accomplit dans la vie quotidienne, habituellement, distraitement, presque sans s’en apercevoir, comme un acte signifiant. »

(Giuseppe Chiari, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(Barbara Clausen : « Contrary to its original nature, performance art, has through the historization of its documentary material become an object and image based art form. As the trace of a message, this material not only adds to the image archive of art history, but is also part of the ongoing process of the cultural canonization of performance art. Initially as a press image, then as a historical document, and finally as a work of art, these images become part of the cultural archive. The accumulation of these moving and still pictures, sketches, manuscritps, and texts forms the pool out of which at most a handful of images will be filtered to represent the iconic status of the unique performance. The documentation of performance art becomes the bearer of the myth of a last moment that can only desired in its non-existence, as a substitute. » 

(Barbara Clausen, After the Act – The (Re)Presentation of Performance Art, Symposium November 4-6, 2005, Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien, Theory Series, Volume 3, Published by Barbara Clausen, 2005, p. 7)

 

(Barbara Clausen : « Most performance artists were aware of the necessity of preserving their actions beyond the moment of their performance manifestation. This desire was based on the one hand on the need to influence the art-historical reception of the artist’s own work, and on the other hand on the social and economic objective of bringing the work to a broader audience. In most cases the audience present at the event was very small and consisted mainly of friends and colleagues, or of people who were there by chance. In contrast to the fact that these actions, which were accessible only to a very few, are widely known. If the small number of live spectators is compared to the level of awareness regarding specific documentations and performances, then the function and signifiance of the documentation of performance art as an instrument of mediation and distribution becomes clear1. This documentation has become a kind of « first layer of history »2, a primary source that provides both practice and theory with models and material to work on. » 

(Barbara Clausen, After the Act – The (Re)Presentation of Performance Art, Symposium November 4-6, 2005, Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien, Theory Series, Volume 3, Published by Barbara Clausen, 2005, p. 9)

Note 1 : (Since the early twentieth century it has been the reproduction and distribution technologies of photography and film, and since the 1960s the video camera, as both a recording and replay medium, that have contributed to the dissemination and popularity of performance art.)

Note 2 : (Quotation from a podium discussion with the photographer and filmmaker Babette Mangolte and the performance theorist RoseLee Goldberg, « RoseLee Goldberg and Babette Mangolte in Conversation », in the course of the exhibition Art, Lies and Videotape: Exposing Performance at the Tate Liverpool, United Kingdom, November 2003)

 

(Jonathan Crary : « Kaprow calls them ‘Activities’ to distinguish them qualitatively from happenings. Intrinsic to his conception of them are: the absence of an audience of any kind, that it is carried out in a physical environment without art world or institutional associations, and that there be no documentation of the event. Each activity has been performed only once, although there is no reason why they’re couldn’t or shouldn’t be repeated. The scripts of many of the Activities have been released in book form with accompanying photographs of a simulated enactement of the work. »

(Jonathan Crary, « Allan Kaprow’s Activities », Arts Magazine, v.51, September 1976, pp.78-81. Article on Kaprow’s ‘activities’ since 1971; discussion of several ‘activities’ (Time Pieces, Routine, On Time, Take-Off, Satisfaction, Comfort Zones, Maneuvers) in relation to interactions that take place between participants during these ‘activities’. Excerpt.)

 

(Joseph Danan : « ‘‘Le théâtre est d’abord un spectacle, une performance éphémère, la prestation de comédiens devant des spectateurs qui regardent, un travail corporel, un exercice vocal et gestuel adressés, le plus souvent dans un lieu particulier et dans un décor particulier. En cela, il n’est pas nécessairement lié à un texte préalablement écrit, et ne donne pas nécessairement lieu à la publication d’un écrit.’’ C’est par ces lignes que Christian Biet et Christophe Triau ouvrent leur livre-somme, Qu’est-ce que le théâtre ? [Gallimard, Folio Essais, 2006, p. 7] Si la performance est inhérente au théâtre, où est donc le problème ? Il vient d’un flottement entre deux acceptions du terme de ‘‘performance’’. Ce que Christian Biet et Christophe Triau mettent en avant, c’est ce que j’appellerais la performance au sens large (proche de l’usage anglo-saxon lorsqu’il s’attache aux performing arts, aux arts de la scène). La performance renvoie alors à l’acte théâtral au présent, dans sa relation avec des spectateurs. Le texte, dans sa forme écrite, disent Biet et Triau, c’est-à-dire fixée, y est condidéré comme facultatif, secondaire, ou, en tout cas, second. 

Cette acception large, Schechner l’étend encore considérablement lorsqu’il lui donne une dimension anthropologique et culturelle qui déborde du théâtre, incluant toutes sortes de rituels, le jeu, le sport, etc.

La seconde acception désigne ce que j’appellerais la performance au sens restreint (le performance art anglo-saxon) et renvoie à un type, disons, d’‘‘événements’’, dont le cadre d’émergence se trouve plutôt du côté des arts plastiques et tendant à prendre appui davantage sur l’image et le corps que sur le texte. Plutôt, car la généalogie en est multiple. Elle passe par les manifestations, en leur temps provocatrices, des avant-gardes européennes des premières décennies du XXe siècle qui, déjà, croisaient les arts et les disciplines, comme le feront, dans le années 50, Cage et Cunningham à partir de L’Événement sans titre (1952). Elle passe aussi par Artaud, et là les choses se compliquent singulièrement : la visée d’Artaud ne concerne-t-elle pas la performance ‘‘au sens large’’ ? J’y reviendrai.

Le flottement entre les deux grandes acceptions du terme se retrouve chez Schechner, qui situe aujourd’hui son travail ‘‘entre théâtre et performance’’. C’est aussi cet espace, ‘‘un champ « entre »’’, que désigne Hans-Thies Lehmann à propos de ce qu’il nomme ‘‘le théâtre postdramatique’’ [Le Théâtre postdramatique, Paris, L’Arche, 2002, p. 216 (trad. Ph.-H. Ledru)]. 

On peut s’accorder sur le fait qu’une cristallisation s’opère dans les années 1960 et 1970 autour du mot ‘‘performance’’, revendiqué par des artistes issus des arts plastiques, et qui ont pour point commun, au-delà de l’extrême diversité des événements (on parle aussi d’‘‘actions’’, et on a parlé de ‘‘happenings’’), la production d’un acte vivant – et croisant, à ce titre, le spectacle du même nom – le plus souvent au sein de lieux d’exposition. 

Il s’agit donc pour ces artistes – que l’on me permette d’enfoncer le clou – de produire un acte vivant à l’intérieur d’un art qui, en quelque sorte, ne le serait pas ou plus suffisamment, un art muséifié, figé, académique. […]

« Ce que j’entends pas ‘‘geste’’ ? Un acte scénique affirmé, s’imposant en tant que tel, ne reproduisant aucun geste antérieur et non reproductible, et d’une puissance, si cela est mesurable, excédant l’ordinaire. »

(Joseph Danan, Entre théâtre et performance : la question du texte, Arles, Actes Sud-Papiers ‘‘Apprendre’’, 2013, p. 6-9) 

(Gillo Dorfles : « L’interaction entre public et artiste détermine la vraie valeur de la performance. »

(Gillo Dorfles, L’Art de la performance, théorie et pratique, n° 2, décembre 1979, p. 47.)

 

(Wayne Enstice : Wayne Enstice in his essay « Performance Art’s Coming of Age » (pp. 143-144) cites formalist developments within the art of the 1960s as signifiant factors in the emergence of performance art in the 1970s : « The vacuity of Minimalist sculpture provoked the viewer to locate the art experience » There were two results. « First, Minimalism changed the customary subject-object roles for the viewer of an artwork. Second, the anxiousness of Minimalism urged the viewer to scrutinize the artist with unusual intensity in an attempt to historicize his intent and process. » Thus, «  the unsettling blankness of Minimalism dislodged the artist more completely from behind the craft of making art, to stress his executive presence. » And he goes on to cite the « inevitable dissolution » of the art object achieved by Conceptual Art as enabling « the artist and his ambition (to) become the cynosure of artistic energy. »

(Wayne Enstice, in The Art of Performance. A Critical Anthology, edited by Gregory Battcock and Robert Nickas, NYC, E.P. Dutton, 1984, p. XVIII)

 

(Esther Ferrer : « Notre travail était vraiment le dépouillement, l’élimination de tout ce qui est théâtral, de tout ce qui est superflu et qui ne sert qu’à gratifier le public en faisant les choses plus jolies. C’était l’action point à la ligne. C’était une nécessité de l’époque. Aujourd’hui on ne peut pas s’attendre à ce que les gens fassent le même genre de performances. Il y a d’autres chats à fouetter dans une société profondément technologique qui pose d’autres questionnements. Nous avons répondu aux problèmes et aux situations politico-sociales de l’époque, vous devez répondre aux vôtres.

À l’époque, lorsque je m’asseyais et que je regardais le public, sans rien faire, il y avait beaucoup de sens à tout ça : le désir de casser le spectaculaire, le côté théâtral, le désir de laisser les gens comprendre la situation, de chercher qui était le spectateur de qui car si tu me regardes et que je te regarde, nous sommes tous les deux dans la même situation ; j’étais leur spectacle et ils étaient mon spectacle. Il fallait confondre les choses, foutre le bordel pour faire évoluer le monde de l’action, le monde du théâtre. Aujourd’hui c’est vraiment un autre pari.

[…] « Pour ces jeunes performeurs – quand tu es vieux c’est autre chose, déjà tu es une espère classique/historique – c’est beaucoup plus difficile. Pourquoi ? parce que les festivals n’en veulent pas. La plupart des festivals recherchent du spectacle, le côté spectaculaire et plusieurs performeurs le savent, mais en plus plusieurs d’entre eux aiment ça. Je le dis sans aucun sens péjoratif. Pourquoi ce retour à l’expressionnisme, au spectaculaire, à la théâtralité, au symbolisme des choses, à cette accumulation de messages ? 

[…] « Il n’y a rien de plus rassurant qu’un spectacle où chaque chose est à sa place, où tout le monde connaît les codes et les respecte. Je suis le spectateur, donc je m’assieds, je la ferme et je regarde ; je suis l’acteur, donc je joue ; c’est très facile, tout le monde connaît le contenu. Au fond certains artistes répondent à un code beaucoup plus facile à saisir et à interpréter que le type qui apparemment ne fait pratiquement rien.

[…] « Quand les gens de théâtre font de la performance, ils jouent, peut-être pas tous, mais 90% de ceux que je connais oui, ils ne peuvent pas s’en empêcher, comme les musiciens ou les danseurs. Depuis un certain temps, il y a une affluence de toutes les pratiques vers la performance. Parfois ces pratiques ne suffisent pas, alors il arrive que les jeunes acteurs soient plus évolués que les formes théâtrales, ce qui crée un décalage. Ces jeunes veulent quand même avoir le droit de faire du théâtre, mais d’une autre façon. Donc, le monde de la performance les libère. 

[…] « Je ne donne pas dans le spectaculaire, je n’aime pas les spectacles pour les spectacles… 

[…] « Pour les puristes qui considèrent qu’il faut classer, construire des tiroirs étiquetés pour qu’il n’y ait pas d’équivoque, d’accord, maintenant il n’y a plus de performance, cherchons un autre terme. Moi je n’en ai pas besoin. La meilleure chose qui puisse arriver c’est que les gens aient des idées différentes. L’unique problème, à mon avis, c’est ce retour en arrière que fait l’art très souvent pour pouvoir continuer à se transformer, et maintenant c’est un retour à des positions dont on voulait se débarrasser lorsque l’art action à commencer. Ce n’est pas seulement dans la théâtralisation de la performance, c’est aussi dans le concept, dans l’idée que la performance doit véhiculer. Il y a beaucoup de lourdeur. Pourtant, la performance, c’est comme un oiseau qui vole, qui s’arrête picoter ici et là et qui reprend son vol, comme un nomade, comme un gitan qui n’a même pas de charrette. Et c’est ça qui me chante dans la performance – c’est un art sans domicile fixe qui peut s’installer partout. »

(Esther Ferrer, « entretien avec Sylvette Babin », revue ESSE Arts+Opinions, été 2000, Montréal, Canada)

 

(Terry Fox : « (Performance) really is a attempt at synthetising communication. It’s a attempt at a new communication. But the only people this art exists for are the people who are there. And it’s the only time the art exists. » 

(Terry Fox, « Interview with Robin White », View 2, no. 3, juin 1979, p. 9)

 

(Hermine Freed : « In many cases, performance art arranges a specific time slot for the work so that the viewer puts himself in a theatrical context. So long as a contract is made between the performer and the viewer to spend time, there seems to be no anxiety about it. Performance art in a gallery context is frequently more anxiety-producing on the part of the viewer than the oher art forms which demand time, but for other reasons. It is the anxiety of confrontation with the performer, doing his act, whether or not you are prepared for it, the constancy of the performance, apparently whether or not there is an audience. »

(Hermine Freed, « In Time, Of Time », Arts Magazine, vol.49, June 1975, pp.82-85. Discusses the element of ‘time’ in art, as seen through video, performance, musical works, etc. « The artist necessarily works in and of time – movement in space and time, recollection and advance in memory and history, passage of experience, and time as subject. » Excerpt.)

 

(Ken Friedman : « The artist, in his role of worker, no matter what particular career-identification he may undertake, has the right to work and earn an honest living. The present system of art marketing and access to public realms constrains the right of art worker in all but a few prominent cases. The artist is treated as a commodity, and thus is dehumanized, denied the right of any working person, and further – even if successful – liable to the merest vagary of fashion or af ill practice at the hands of the marketeer. 

I proposed that henceforth I will regard myself not as a commodity, but as a professional. As such, rather than selling art works, I will only sell my professional services. »

(Ken Friedman, The Aesthetics, San Diego: Self-published. 1966)

 

(RoseLee Goldberg : « So while some ‘conceptual’ artists were refuting the art object, others saw the experience of space and of their body as providing the most immediate and existentially real alternative. Much of conceptual art, when presented as either ‘land,’ or ‘performance’ art, implied indirectly or directly a particular attitude to an investigation of the experience of space. This experience may seem to have little to do with the intentions of the meaning of a piece, but from the viewer’s standpoint the experience of the piece sets up a new set of responses to the perception of space. Whereas earlier representations of space in art have been discussed variously from the simple planes of gothic paintings to the disappearing perspectives of early renaissance and renaissance art, or from the surfaces of cubist painting to the enormous space obstructions of minimal sculpture, much recent art has insisted on the body as a direct measure of space. The relationship between the viewer, the artist and the art work then became an important one, since the viewer would have to put together the indeterminate elements of the space in order to fully perceive the piece.

…performance art, now as in the twenties, directly reflects spatial preoccupations in the art world. But unlike the twenties, when the separation between theory and practice (in a dialectical form or not) was absolute, it is difficult to separate where ‘conceptual’ art ends and performance begins. For conceptual art contains the premise that the idea may or may not be executed. Sometimes it is theoretical or conceptual, sometimes it is material and performed. So to with performance art. It even uses a ‘conceptual’ language (photograph, diagram, documentation) to communicate ideas. So on the one hand, the language of conceptual art has expanded that of performance art to a point where the medium of communication is very similar. On the other hand, and in reverse, performance has altered the way that conceptual artists were working. »

(RoseLee Goldberg, « Space as Praxis », Studio International, v.190, September 1975, pp.130-136. Discussion of “production of space“ in art, steeming from an exhibition-publication, A Space: A Thousand Words, held February 1975 at the Royal College of Art Gallery, London. Goldberg discusses ‘a new sense of space’ described under the following terms: constructed space and powerfields (Nauman, Acconci), natural space (Oppenheim), body space (Forti, T. Brown, Rainer), spectator space (D. Graham), public and private space (Buren, Dimitriejvic). Excerpts.)

 

(Guillermo Gómez-Penã : « La performance, en tant que “genre” artistique est en perpétuel état de crise et est donc le médium idéal pour articuler un temps de la crise permanente qui est la nôtre. La performance, c’est la présence et non la représentation ; ce n’est pas (comme les théories théâtrales classiques le suggéreraient) un miroir, mais le moment réel durant lequel le miroir se brise. L’acte de créer et de présenter une performance porte un sens de l’urgence et de l’immédiateté qui n’existe dans aucun autre champ artistique. Nous expérimentons la vie, donc nous performons – ou plutôt, nous performons au même titre que nous vivons, aimons, voyageons et souffrons, le tout étant entremêlé en un tissage complexe. Voyager, aussi bien géographiquement que culturellement, devient une part intrinsèque du processus artistique, particulièrement pour ceux d’entre nous qui se considèrent comme des migrants ou des passeurs de frontière. »

(Guillermo Gómez-Penã, Dangerous Border Crossers, extrait)

 

(Otto Hahn/Marcel Duchamp : « Voici un fragment inédit d’une interview accordée à Otto Hahn par Duchamp où celui-ci se réfère à deux happenings new-yorkais de Kaprow :

« O. H. : Qu’est-ce que vous pensez des happenings ?

M. D. : Je m’y intéresse beaucoup... J’ai vu un happening où on se précipitait dans les rangs des spectateurs avec un coupe-gazon. Cela produit un bruit infernal. J’aime bien le bruit. J’ai assisté à un autre happening dans le deuxième sous-sol d’un théâtre, parmi les compteurs à gaz et les chaudières… Il ne se passait rien, une vague femme à poil sur un tas de charbon… C’est le miteux par excellence. Mais faire partauger les gens dans vingt centimètres d’eau pour voir cela, c’est admirable. Cela détruit le mythe de l’art.

O. H. : Tout n’est que mirage.

M. D. : La beauté du mirage, il n’y a que cela. »

(cité par Jean-Jacques Lebel, Le Happening, Paris, Denoël, 1966, p. 54-55)

 

(Andree Hayum : « To define Performance through the work of these artists is to arrive at a kind of crossbreed. Here, for instance, form exists in space but also establishes itself through time so that certain musical expressions as well as video and film can become shifting parts of this overall category. Presentations generally consist of small groups of performers or, at times, the ‘choreographer’ alone. Relatedly, the performance area is more often like a work space than a formal theatratical setting. Initially avoiding the dramatic structure and psychological dynamics of traditional theater or dance, bodily presence and movement activities have been central elements in the work of these artists. »

(Andree Ayum, « Notes on Performance and the Arts, » Art Journal, v.34, Summer 1975, pp.337-339. Report on the ‘Performance and the Arts’ session held at the 1975 College Art Association conference in Washington, D.C. The session was coordinated by Allan Kaprow with Vito Acconci, Joan Jonas, Yvonne Rainer, and Allan Kaprow as panel participants. Excerpt.)

 

(Dick Higgins : « Je comprends par happening la totalité des diverses formes de représentation dans lesquelles l’accent est mis, moins sur celui qui exécute une chose particulière ou pourquoi il l’accomplit, que, simplement, sur le fait qu’elle soit accomplie. »

(Dick Higgins, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(John Howell : (Editor of Alive, a magazine devoted to performance and other forms of « live » art : « A performance has this obvious condition : when the show’s over it’s gone. The remaining evidence – articles and reviews, photographs, notes, and scripts – can only suggest the event. As a medium, then, performances are acutely exposed to, if not dependent on, critical conceits (individual approaches, theoretical bias) which claim to render missing object. For certain performance artists who locate their dance, music, or theater in the art context… the critical vocabulary for dance, music, and theater are often too conservative for the scope of their performances : at the same time an art vocabulary is insufficient for dealing with the attitudes and techniques of those traditions. »

(John Howell, « Performance », Art in America 63, no. 3 (May-June 1975), p. 18)

 

(Amelia Jones : « J’avais trente ans – 1991 – quand j’ai commencé à étudier la performance ou le body art de cette explosive et importante période, entièrement au travers de la documentation. Je suis un peu dans l’inconfortable mais enviable position d’avoir été associée à ce numéro spécial. Présenté comme une sorte d’histoire orale, selon les termes de l’éditeur, le numéro est basé (fondé) sur la prémisse qu’il faut avoir été là – en chair et en os – pour bien connaître l’histoire. On m’a demandé de fournir une contre-narration en m’exprimant sur la ‘‘problématique d’une personne de mon âge produisant un travail sur des performances qu’elle n’a pas vues [en personne]’’.Ce programme me force à l’affronter : n’ayant pas été sur place, j’approche les travaux d’art corporel à partir de leur traces photographiques, textuelles, orales, vidéo et/ou filmiques. Je voudrais soutenir, de toute manière, que les problèmes soulevés par mon absence (ma non-présence à l’événement) sont plus logistiques qu’éthiques ou herméneutiques. En fait, quoique l’expérience de regarder une photographie et de lire un texte est évidemment différente de celle de s’asseoir dans une petite pièce à regarder un artiste agir, aucune n’a une relation privilégiée à la ‘‘vérité’’ historique de la performance […]. »

« …C’est mon hypothèse ici, comme elle l’a été ailleurs, qu’il n’y a pas de possibilité d’une relation non médiatisée avec n’importe laquelle des productions culturelles, incluant le body art. Bien que je sois respectueuse de la spécificité des connaissances acquises en participant à une situation de performance en direct, je soutiendrai ici que cette spécificité ne devrait pas être surestimée par rapport à la spécificité des connaissances qui se développent au contact des traces documentaires d’un tel événement. »

(Amelia Jones, « Presence in Absentia », Art Journal, no.4, vol.56, winter 1997, p.11-12.)

 

(Amelia Jones : « la stratégie de l’auto-performance dans l’autoportrait photographique a une force particulière pour les femmes artistes qui luttent pour s’affirmer comme ‘‘auteures’’ plutôt que comme ‘‘objets’’ d’une création artistique et qui interviennent dans les structures du voyeurisme au sein desquelles le corps des femmes est subordonné à un regard qui s’aligne avec les sujets masculins. »

(Amelia Jones, « Performing the Other as Self », in S. Smith et J. Watson (dir.), Interfaces, Women, Autobiography, Image, Performance, Ann Arbor, The University of Michigan Press, 2002, p. 69)

 

(Prudence Juris : Excerpt: « PJ: How is performance different from theatre?

TM: For a lot of reasons. One is that in performance sculpture the interaction of artists with their materials is direct. He relates forms to himself or other forms in performance in a way that traditional sculpture related one form to another. The difference is that the forms aren’t static. They are changing. That element of time is there too. In Theatre it is compressed time. A period of six months can take place in two hours, but in sculpture, two hours is two hours. It is a real time, it isn’t an illusion. Time is the difference. Also, it can’t be repeated. If it’s repeated then it becomes theatre.

PJ: Do you think the public is becoming more receptive?

TM: Art is more philosophical. It demands that the public be more philosophical about their perceiving art. It seems less virtual and more idea-oriented, and requires more thought process. You learn about the time. Like in minimal sculpture. People related to that like they did to music. Before rock music you heard only with your ears. Then rock music developed at the same time as minimal sculpture, and people listened with their whole bodies. The volume was so intense you took it into your skin. The same thing happened to sculpture. You felt it with your whole body.

PJ: So you think that conceptual art is a revolutionary aspect.

TM: Yes. Conceptual art is a major break in the beginning of modern art. Because it leaves the object. It is the most significant jump in art in the history of art. »

(Prudence Juris, « The Never Art: Tom Marioni in Conversation with Prudence Juris, » Studio International, v. 183, May 1972, p. 191)

 

(Theo Kneubuehler : « The Happening, art understood as process and as product, demands modes of behavior. The individual can assume a role, or reject it. As soon as he rejects it, he violates the group code and places himself beyond the pale of the given system. The Happening as an event reproducing social mechanisms promotes consciousness, without thereby having any direct consequences for society. »

(Theo Kneubuehler, « The Happening: History, Theory and Consequences, » Werk, v.58, February 1971, pp.116-24, 142-143. Extensive historical essay on the Happening, in German with English translation. Excerpts.)

 

(Allan Kaprow : « To escape from the trap of art, it is not enough to be against museums or to stop producing marketable objects; the artist of the future must learn how to evade his profession;

Sophistication of consciousness in the arts today (1969) is so great that it is hard not to assert as matters of fact:

that the LM mooncraft is patently superior to all contemporary sculptural efforts;

that the broadest verbal exchange between Houston’s Manned Spacecraft Center and the Apollo 11 astronauts was better than contemporary poetry;

that, with its sound distortions, beeps, static and communication breaks, such exhanges also surpassed the electronic  music of the concert halls; 

that certain remote control video tapes of the lives of ghetto families recorded (with their permissions) by anthropologists, are more fascinating than the celebrated slice-of-slice underground films;

that not a few of those brightly lit, plastic and stainless-steel gas stations of, say, Las Vegas, are the most extraordinary architecture to date;

that the random, trancelike movements of shoppers in the supermarket richer than anything done in the modern dance;

that the lint under beds and the debris of industrial dumps are more engaging than the recent rash of exhibitions of scattered waste matter;

that the vapor trails left by rocket tests – motionless, rainbow colored, sky-filling scribbles – are unequaled by artists exploring gaseous mediums;

that the Southwest Asian theater of war in Viet Nam, or the trial of the ‘Chicago Eight,’ while indefensible, is better theater than any play;

that… etc., etc., … non-art is more art than ART-art.

(Allan Kaprow, « Education of the Un-Artist, » Art News,  v.69, February 1971, pp.28-31, 66. Excerpt.)

 

(Allan Kaprow : « To understand non-treatrical performance as an idea, it might be worthwhile to consider the current state of the art profession in the West. Every artist has at her or his fingertips a body of information about what has been done and what is being done. There are certain options. Making performance of some sort is one of them. Making non-art into art is another. Non-art art, when applied to performing, means making a performance tant resemble what’s been called art performance. Art performance is that range of doing things called theater. An artist choosing to make non-art performances simply has to know what theatrical performances are and avoid  doing them, quite consciously, at least in the beginning. The value in listing one’s options is to make things as conscious as possible; experimentaters can experiment more when they know what’s what. Accordingly, here is the ball game I perceive: an artist can

1) work within recognizable art modes and present the work recognizable art contexts

e.g. paintins in galleries

poetry in poetry books

music in concert halls, etc.

2) Work in unrecognizable art modes but present the work in non-art contexts

e.g. a pizza parlor in a gallery

a telephone book sold as poetry, etc.

3) work in recognizable art modes but present the work in non-art contexts

e.g. a ‘Rembrandt as an ironing board’

a fugue in an air conditioning duct

a sonnet as a want-ad, etc.

4) work in non-art modes but present the work as art in non-art contexts

e.g. perception tests in a psychology lab

anti-erosion terracing in the hills

typewriter repairing

garbage collecting, etc. (with the proviso that the art world knows about it)

5) work in non-art modes and non-art contexts but cease to call the work art, retaining instead the private consciouness that something it may be art, too.

e.g. systems analysis

social work in a ghetto

hitchhiking

thinking, etc.

Any artist can locate him-or herself among these five options. Most belong to the first, very few occupy the fourth, and so far, I know of no one who fits the fifth who hasn’t simply dropped out of art entirely. (One runs into such post-graduates from time to time, but their easy testimonials to the good life lack the dense ironies of doublethink that would result from simultaneous daily participation in art and, say, finance.)

Performance in the non-treatrical sense that I am discussing hovers very close to this fifth possibility, yet the intellectual discipline it implies and the indifference to validation by the art world it would require, suggest that such a person would view art less as a profession than as a metaphor. At present such performance is generally non-art activity conducted in non-art contexts but offered as quasi-art to art-minded people. That is, to those not interested in whether it is or isn’t art, but who may be interested for other reasons, it need not be justified as an artwork. Thus, in a performance of 1968, which involved documenting the circumstances of many tire changes at gas stations in New Jersey, curious station attendants were frequently told it was a sociological study (which it was, in a way), while those in the cars knew it was also art. »

(Allan Kaprow, « Non-Theatrical Performance », Artforum, v.14, May 1976, pp.45-51. Kaprow discusses the difference between theatrical and non-treatrical performance. Descrive a happening entitled Berlin Fever, arranged by Wolf Vostell in West Berlin, 1973, and a work by Kaprow, entitled 7 Kinds of Sympathy, that took place in Vienna, 1976. Excerpt.)

 

(Allan Kaprow : « Up to this point I contrasted audience participation theater in popular and art culture with participation performance relating to everyday routines. I’d like now to look more closely at this lifelike performance, beginning with how a  normal routine becomes the performance of a routine.

Consider certain common transactions – shaking hands, eating, saying goodbye – as ‘readymades’. Their only unusual feature will be the attentiveness brought to bear on them. They aren’t someone else’s routines that are to be observed, but one’s own, just as they happens. »

(Allan Kaprow, « Participation Performance », Artforum, v.15, March 1977, pp.24-29. Major theoretical article. Excerpt.)

 

(Allan Kaprow/Moira Roth : « AK: Performance is simply the latest word for real-time activity. Whether or not we use one generic term or another, I think we’ve got to a point where so many people are doing Performance, and there’s a sufficient twenty year history now within our immediate ken, that we can actually make distinctions between kinds. My “kind“ was and still is eccentric compared to what other people are doing in Performance. I feel very little kinship with most of what’s going on, though I’m interested in it.

I always had a kind of social science bias. It was “parlor“ anthropology in the beginning, from reading Sir James Frazer and other people like that.

MR: Erving Goffman?

AK: Yes, surely. I was also interested in Birdwhistle, who made very careful analyses of film and video recordings of, for instance, facial expressions accompanying conversations, which were done with analysers. Reading them led into a very different idea of human behavior as it applied to Performance from that of my colleagues.

MR: Like Oldenburg and Dine ?

AK: Yes. Or, Vostell. As much as I admired their work, and still so, it seemed to have no particular application to my concerns. Perhaps the one Performance artist whose interests in behavior overlap mine is Acconci. »

(Allan Kaprow/Moira Roth, « Allan Kaprow Interviewed by Moira Roth », Sun & Moon: A Journal of Litterature and Art, no.5, Fall 1978, pp.69-77. An interview, conducted Fall 1977. Excerpt.)

 

(Christophe Kihm : « En 2010, dans son contexte particulièrement exalté, où ce terme semble plus que jamais ouvert à toute proposition artistique pour peu qu’une action y soit produite, et puisqu’avec la performance les voies de l’interdisciplinarité semblent immédiatement retrouver celle de l’indiscipline, il devient difficile d’assigner des limites à un territoire précis. Tout le monde fait de la performance ou du moins croit en faire. Étrange situation pour une pratique minoritaire qui, historiquement, avait fait de ce statut mineur la condition même de ses audaces. Il apparaît plus que jamais nécessaire de repenser l’ensemble de ces pratiques, de situer leurs enjeux, et de spécifier au sein de l’ensemble « performance » des discriminations pertinentes afin de mieux les évaluer. »

Christophe Kihm, Art Press 2, n° 18, consacré à « Performances contemporaines » (août-septembre-octobre 2010, p. 5)

 

(Milan Knizak : « Ce n’est ni un art ni un non-art, chaque non-art n’étant qu’un anti-art. Seulement une activité. Activité très importante pour l’homme, non pour l’art. Et c’est pourquoi les critiques d’art les plus sérieux ne peuvent pas en comprendre les principes. »

(Milan Knizak, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(Helena Kontova : « Painting has been transformed by absorbing elements of performance, installation art, and photography. Avant-garde art in the sixties and seventies was characterized by the use of extra-artistic objects (including the human body), accentuating their materiality and objectification, and was also characterized as pure representation (which, in some cases, could be termed a new form of show). Consequently, painting in general, and the paintings of ex-performers in particular, tend to assume some of the characteristics. »

(Helena Kontova, « From Performance to Painting », Flash Art, no. 106 (Februar-March 1982), p. 17.

 

(Jannis Kounellis : « In 1960 I did a continuous performance, first in my studio and then at the Galeria Tartaruga in Roma, in which I Stretched unsized canvases… over all the walls in the room, and painted letters over them which I sang. The problem in those days was to establish a new kind of painting…

(Jannis Kounellis : « Structure and sensibility: An Interview with Jannis Kounellis » (with Willoughby Sharp), Avalanche, no. 5 (summer 1972), p. 21)

 

(Jannis Kounellis : « One needs to consider that the gallery is a dramatic, theatrical cavity. »

(J. Kounellis : « Interview with Robin White », View 1, no. 10 (March 1979), p. 17.)

 

(Max Kozloff : « An extended litterature has grown in support of efforts that include bodyworks. But we only tentatively inderstand such art, even at this mature stage in its development, because the criteria for separating it from other forms are not clear. An artist may do an ephemeral ‘piece’ for a necessarily small audience, an event often completely dependent on media transmission for broacast to the art world. Or the artist may conceive a media-form – photos, optionally accompanied by words – as the prime stimulus for the viewer. In one instance, the evidence is fragmentary and, in the other, exclusive and sufficient. This reliance on graphic cum literature permits the enlargement of extremely small-scale incidents, such as Dennis Oppenheim running a sliver through his thumb. Photos sometimes become records of occurences the artist felt no need to have presented to an initially present audience. And they may even be of situations that never existed, such as William Wegman’s and Vicenzo Agnetti’s face mutations. So the literature, heavily contributed to by the artists themselves, invariably reverts to a repertorial discourse. Most typically it carries bibliographical entries, compiled data, scenario descriptions; and it comes in the form of interviews, catalogues, and informative materials published by galleries and museums. To leaf through these documents is simultaneously to be impressed by the richness of their ideas and frustrated by their lack of any felt need to evaluate the convergences of such art. Neutral in the extreme, the tone of this literature would appear detached from its object, until we recognize its characteristic cool as a publicity function. Just as the body is artistically dissociated from the person, so critical regard is isolated from warmth, in a reading too close to serve as cultural perspective. »

(Max Kozloff, « Pygmalion Reverse », Artforum, v.14, november 1975, pp.30-37. Major article on body art. excerpt.)

 

(Suzanne Lacy/Richard Newton : « RN: What is performance art? Are there parameters?

SL: Performance is a definition that is rapidly changing. It is really in a state of flux right now. It wasn’t five years ago and it is now.

Five years ago it was a pretty clearly defined as an offshoot of happening – a kind of singularization of the mass environmental activity that happenings were – brought down into one person. It was very psychodynamic, very much about the experience of the artist as he or she performed.

In the last five years it’s mushroomed into 100 different directions. You find people like Yvonne Rainer going into movies. You find people like Lynn Hershman who have gone in a whole other direction, one that hasn’t yet been defined. An environmental performantive activity in which the entire environment is considered. Generally it’s in a public place and the artist acts as either a director or, if as a performer, as simply one element in the piece. »

(Suzanne Lacy & Richard Newton, « She Who Would Fly », High Performance, no.1, v.1, February 1978, pp.4-7, 44-46. A major interview. Includes descriptions of some works performed during 1977, with photo documentation.)

 

(Pierre Larauza, compagnie T.R.A.N.S.I.T.S.C.A.P.E., entretien avec Anissa Kapelusz : « Anissa Kapelusz : Quelle est votre définition des mots « performer » et « performance » ?

Pierre Larauza : J’emploie le mot « performance, parce qu’on nous a mis dans le milieu de la performance et pense qu’on nous y a mis parce qu’on ne savait pas où nous mettre. Mais d’après ce que je vois de la performance… On n’est pas vraiment dedans, pas au sens historique. Il existe des festivals de performance où je ne me retrouverais absolument pas. Mais peut-être qu’aujourd’hui, la performance s’est agrandie et que nous en faisons maintenant partie. (…) Pour moi c’est un peu un mot galvaudé, la « performance ». C’est un mot fourre-tout dans lequel on nous met, parce qu’on ne sait pas où nous mettre ailleurs. Ça ne me gêne pas, mais je suis conscient que pour certains puristes, ce n’est pas vraiment de la performance. De même que je pense que pour certains puristes, on ne fait pas non plus de la danse, du théâtre ou de la vidéo.

« On a aussi joué le jeu. La « performance », c’est aussi une stratégie marketing. Je gère un peu la diffusion et je sais qu’il y a une stratégie sémantique à tenir pour faire partie des tendances émergentes et innovantes. »

(Anissa Kapelusz, Usage du dispositif au théâtre. Usage et expérience d’un art contemporain, thèse de doctorat en études théâtrales, sous la direction de Joseph Danan, Université de la Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris 3, 11/12/12, annexe volume 2, p. XXVI et p. XXVII.)

 

(Jean-Jacques Lebel : « Le happening est avant tout un moyen d’expression plastique. En plaçant physiquement la peinture dans  (et non, à la manière de Pollock, au-dessus de) son véritable contexte subconscient, il effectue les transmissions, il introduit le regardeur directement dans l’événement. »

(Jean-Jacques Lebel, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(Ira Licht : « On doit considérer les artistes eux-mêmes comme objets d’art. Alors que les attitudes de ces artistes à propos des enregistrements visuels diffèrent, pour la plupart ce qui est vu dans les galeries peut être considéré comme une documentation. Même dans ces travaux expressément créés pour n’exister que sous forme de photographie ou de vidéo, le pouvoir de la physicalité et la franchise psychologique du geste transcendent sa représentation que nous sommes plus habitués à interpréter comme fac-similés que comme objet. Ainsi il y a un minimum d’intervention physique dans la communication entre l’artiste et son public. En éliminant l’objet d’art – la peinture ou la sculpture présentées comme indépendantes des circonstances de leur création – l’artiste corporel offre à la place sa réalité, ses activités corporelles et sa psyché. Au lieu d’un objet intermédiaire investi par la personnalité de l’artiste et laissé à l’interprétation d’un public ignorant de la psychologie de son créateur, l’art corporel délivre une information directe à travers la confrontation […]. »

(Ira Licht, Bodyworks, Chicago: Museum of Contemporary Art, 1975. Catalogue for the exhibition, Bodyworks, at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Excerpt from the catalogue essay by Ira Licht, n.p.)

 

(Ira Licht : « Distinct from the theatricality of Happenings and the formality of the contemporary dance, by both of which it has been influenced, and unlike performance art, with which it has certain similarities, Bodyworks is primarily personal and private. Its content is autobiographical and the body is used as the very body of a particular person rather than as an abstract entity or in a role. Action oriented artists such as Acconci, Beuys, Burden, and Schwarzkogler, whose attitudes are extrapolations from the physical activity of art-making into performance situations, may admit audiences; nevertheless the content of the ‘performance’ is intimately involved with the artist’s psychological condition and personal concerns. Those artists – Luthi, Nauman and Samaras, for example – who are in the tradition of the cult of the self, pose privately just for the photographic record. In either case it is the artist’s physical being which bears the content and is both subject and means of aesthetic expression. » 

(Ira Licht, Bodyworks, Chicago: Museum of Contemporary Art, 1975. Catalogue for the exhibition, Bodyworks, at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Excerpt from the catalogue essay by Ira Licht, n.p.)

 

(Lucy R. Lippard : (performance is) « the most immediate art form, which aspires to the immediacy of political action itself. Ideally, performance means getting down to the bare bones of aesthetic communication – artist/self confronting audience/society. »

(Lucy R. Lippard, « The Angry Month of March », The Village Voice, March 25, 1981, p. 91.)

 

(Carl Eugene Loeffler : « Performance is executed both in private or before a live audience, and is variously called actions, events, performances, pieces, things, or even happenings. Some of the works are about the artist’s body, correspondingly termed body art. Some have been regarded as « sculpture as action », where the work exists only during the time of its demonstration, often through a non-treatrical, direct use of materials. Other performance work is theatrical in the use of illusion and can convey a fictionnal or autobiographical narrative, stressing elements of staging.

« Performance can illustrate socio-political concerns, and the idea of performance can « frame » religious rituals and daily routine activity. Yet there are examples that call for a merging with technology, as in the case of video performance, or investigate robotics and interactive communication technologies. The materials utilized in performance can be high-tech or biological, tangible or intangible. The processes employed can be naturally occurring, or contrived. Our condition is examined through performance and the information relayed can be closed, systematically reporting on itself, or open, reporting on interaction and communion with other materials and situations. »

(Carl Eugene Loeffler (San Francisco, 1989), Introduction, Performance Anthology. Source Book of California Performance Art, Edited by Carl E. Loeffler and Darlene Tong, Last Gasp Press and Contemporary Arts Press, San Francisco, 1989, (First Edition : 1980), p. viii.)

 

(Éric Mangion : « Un autre quiproquo vient de l’ambivalence du mot entre son origine anglaise et sa traduction française. Pour les anglosaxons, tout jeu d’acteur ou toute interprétation musicale ou chorégraphique est une performance. Un artiste « exécutant » est donc performer. En France, la performance est essentiellement liée à la pratique d’artistes plasticiens qui transgressent leurs univers, ou du moins aux artistes qui font preuve de tentatives de croiser les genres, ce qui semble beaucoup plus logique quant au rapport avec l’histoire et aux fondements de l’art-action. Appeler le moindre spectacle « performance » comme on le lit trop souvent fait perdre du sens au sujet et à l’objet même de l’art-action. Par contre, le mot « performatif » dans sa version française n’a rien à voir au préalable avec un vocabulaire esthétique. Un énoncé performatif constitue l’acte auquel il se réfère . Comme le suggère David Zerbib, nous devrions plutôt employer le mot « performantiel » . Même si ce contresens s’avère peu handicapant et possède lui aussi l’avantage d’être entré dans le langage courant, il peut dans certains cas engendrer une confusion dans l’analyse critique de l’art-action, notamment quand le mot performatif est utilisé pour évoquer certaines performances liées au langage, sans faire la nuance avec sa portée sémantique. » (p. 6)

Éric Mangion, catalogue À la vie délibérée. Une histoire de la performance sur la Côte d’Azur de 1951 à 2011 (Villa Arson, 1er juillet au 28 octobre 2012)

 

(Tom Marioni : « When Jackson Pollock and Morris Louis let the paint leave their hands, gravity formed the shape of the stain on the raw canvas. This exhibition of abstract expressionism is a direct extension of the painting of the 50’s; the action is the same only the dimensions are different. The gesture is the same and the procedure similar if more athletic. The artists exhibit the same love of organic and natural forces, they place a familiar emphasis on the role of accident and chance.

The renewed interest in natural forces and raw materials exists for several reasons. There is, certainly, a tremendous dissatisfaction with the destructive forces of modern culture; war, pollution, and the generally widespread ignorance of nature. Another influence is the popularity of drug use, and the religious importance that it places on an awareness of our environment and also upon the reality of natural processes and environment. But perhaps more importantly, the artists are not interested in producing objects. The majority of the pieces exist only for the duration of the show. There are no photographs in the catalogue because some work cannot be seen before installation. In fact, several artists have sent only instructions for the creation of their works. It would harm the intent of the work to frame or reduce them to the degree needed for reproduction and, the nature of the work precludes reproduction. For the first time, the artist is freeing himself from the object. As a result, the historian is now faced with the responsability of recording the work. The artist is involved with the direct manipulation of materials that possess qualities of spontaneity and improvisation, and that normally produces dispensable work.

It is the act of creation which is art. » -

(Tom Marioni, The Return of Abstract Expressionism. Richmond, Ca.: Richmond Art Center, 1969. Catalogue for the group exhibition entitled The Return of Abstract Expressionism, September 25-November 2, 1969. Excerpt, Introduction by Tom Marioni)

 

(Rosemary Mayer : « For a number of reasons, performance art is most open to elucidation by consideration of the personalities, life experiences, and life styles of the people who do it. Firstly, with performance art there is the immediate, obvious connection between artist and work – the artist as performer. The artist’s physical capacities and appearance partially define the work. Secondly, performance art has almost no inherited, traditional form to come between the artist and his idea. The art ide ais not mediated through canvas and stretchers or the materials of sculpture. The artist and his activities make up the physical presence of the work. Thirdly, some new way of looking at performance art is needed since this kind of art deals with psychology, philosophy, cybernetics, sociology, learning theory, little of which is considered in most present art criticism when it deals with specific works and all of which are as equally if not more intimately connected with the life experiences of the artists concerned than with their experiences from past and contemporary art. It could be said that performance artists develop their ideas through conversation and readings in psychology, philosophy, etc. But when one reads in any of these fields it is the principles and situation most like those one has personally known which influence throught. »

[…] 

(Carl E. Loeffler : Mayer contends that performance art is most explicable by considering the life experience of the artists who produce the work because: 1. the relationship of the artist is to performance as subject-object. 2. the nonexistence of a traditional form. 3. most art criticism is formalist by nature.)

(Rosemary Mayer, « Performance & Experience », Arts Magazine, v. 47, December 1972/January 1973, pp. 33-36. General essay on performance art, the influence of life experiences on the art produced by an artist. Excerpts.)

 

(David Medalla : « I dream of the day when I shall create sculptures that breathe, perspire, cough, laugh, yawn, smirk, wink, pant, dance, walk, crawl… and move among people as shadows move along people. »

(David Medalla, Sign 1, no. 8, juin-juillet 1965, repris dans le catalogue When Attitudes Become Form (Kunsthalle, Berne, 1969, non paginé)

 

(Herbert Molderings : « It is certainly not accidental that Happenings and action art, the forerunners of the performance movement, started around 1960 when television began to play a major role in everyday life. »

(Herbert Molderings, « Life is no Performance : Performance by Jochen Gerz », in The Art of Performance. A Critical Anthology, edited by Gregory Battcock and Robert Nickas, NYC, E.P. Dutton, 1984.)

 

(Kathy O’Dell : « Une réponse haptique inconsciente est suscitée quand le spectateur touche une photographie prise par un photographe qui toucha le déclencheur de l’appareil alors que le ‘‘performer’’ touchait sa peau, utilisant  son corps à la fois comme un moyen de contact et un matériau de la performance. Cette chaîne d’espériences, fonctionnant rétrospectivement, enchaîne le spectateur au photographe/spectateur mais aussi le ‘‘performer’’ en une complicité métaphorique. »

(Kathy O’Dell, Contract with the Skin. Masochism Performance Art and the 1970s, Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 1998, p. 14)

 

(Brian O’Doherty : « It was with Abstract Expressionism that critics firts began consistently describing artists as ‘performers’… and grading them according to ‘performance’. With the emphasis on ‘gesture’ and ‘action’ one began to get double image of what was hailed as the single ultimate image in art : the picture and behind it, the artist, like some gesticulating ghostly presence. »

(Brian O’Doherty, « Looking at the Artist as Performer », in Object and Idea : An Art Critic’s Journal 1961-1967, NYC, Simon & Schuster, 1967), p. 227 (Originally written in August 1964).

 

(Orlan : «  O : Pour moi, la performance est un cadre vide dans lequel les pratiques artistiques viennent se questionner. Contrairement à ce que certains pensent, la performance n’est pas un style voué à l’éphémère et qui serait identifié aux années 70. Actuellement, les performances sont présentes partout, dans toutes les générations, et également dans les écoles des beaux-arts.

C’est un endroit qui s’est inventé peu à peu et il a pris des aspects différents. L’art-performance s’est déjà différencié de la performance physique. Plusieurs catégories de performance sont apparues : la performance vidéo, la performance danse, la performance son… On pourrait dire que la performance est une tendance artistique influencée par toutes ces pratiques. Aussi échappe-t-elle à toute saisie et à toute définition. Comme c’est le cas généralement pour d’autres arts, il y a toujours une part de résonance avec la société dans laquelle elle s’inscrit. Or la société est toujours en mouvement, aux niveaux politique, intellectuel, social tout comme au niveau de ses interdits, ce qui ajoute à la difficulté et qui explique aussi ses évolutions. Dans cette nouvelle pratique artistique intervient le médium corps, ce qui facilite l’identification car tout le monde a un corps. Cela engendre une très forte intensité avec le public, c’est ce qui en fait la qualité. Toutefois cette qualité diffère de celle rencontrée habituellement du théâtre, auquel on l’assimile parfois. Il peut y avoir des porosités entre ces deux arts, des passages, des liens. Des différences sont cependant perceptibles. Les performances peuvent avoir lieu sur une scène, dans une salle, dans la rue, mais les performers ne jouent pas un texte appris et restitué, ils sont plutôt dans une sorte de mise en jeu d’eux-mêmes. Les spectateurs n’assistent pas à un faux drame qui se jouerait devant eux. Dans le cas de la performance, il s’agit d’un vrai drame qui se vit à cet instant-là. Donc les performers, ce ne sont plus des acteurs, mais bien des actants

S.R. : Considérez-vous qu’il s’agit d’un ‘‘art-action’’ ?

O. : On peut dire ‘‘quelque chose se passe’’ et c’est une action. Mais est-ce que toutes les performances sont des performances d’action ? Effectivement je suis passée par quelque chose qui s’appelle ‘‘action’’ dans mon travail. J’ai fait beaucoup d’actions qui se sont passées effectivement dans le tissu urbain : les actions de rue. J’ai appelé toute une série de mes oeuvres Action ORLAN-CORPS. A l’intérieur de ses Actions ORLAN se trouvent aussi les ‘‘Corps-sculptures’’. » 

[corps-sculptures : « j’ai également conçu une série qui s’appelle ‘‘Corps-sculptures’’ où je considérais le corps comme une sculpture et privais mon visage d’identité en le cachant soit par la pose soit par les cheveux ou un masque. » ORLAN cité par Bart de Baere, Sophie Gregoir, Wim Van Mulders, Hubert Besacier et Alain Charre (eds), Orlan MesuRages (1968-2012). Action ORLAN-Corps, Anvers, Éditions du M HKA, 2012, p. 10-11]

(Orlan, « entretien avec Sylvie Roques, mardi 27 novembre 2012 au studio Orlan à Paris », revue Communications, n° 92, 2013, Paris, Seuil, p. 219.)

 

(Gina Pane : « Our entire culture is based on the representation of the body. Performance doesn’t so much annul painting as help out the birth of a new painting based on different explanations and functions of the body in art. »

(Gina Pane, « Wound as a sign », Flash Art, nos 92-93 (oct.-nov. 1979), p. 37.)

 

(Bruno Péquignot : « Ce qui reste d’une performance, c’est a minima un récit, ou un scénario, et au-delà des photos, des films qui attestent que quelque chose s’est produit, mais ces traces […] ne sont pas des ‘‘oeuvres’’. […] Mais étendre la notion de performance à l’ensemble des réalisations des arts vivants fait courir le risque d’en diluer l’intérêt théorique et esthétique et il me semble qu’il vaut mieux ici s’en tenir à ce qui se présente comme tel, quelle que soit la discipline concernée. Certes, il y a des performances en arts vivants, mais tous les spectacles d’art vivant n’en relève pas.  »

(Bruno Péquignot « De la performance dans les arts », revue Communications, n° 92, 2013, Paris, Seuil, p. 11)

 

(Mario Perniola : « …le sex-appeal de l’inorganique est justement le contraire du plaisir : non pas la douleur, mais un effort, une entreprise, un exercice, un entraînement, une performance. De cette façon, non seulement les sons, les espaces, les objets et les mots, mais aussi les actions se libèrent de leur rapport avec l’esprit et avec la vie et deviennent des choses qui sentent et qui sont senties.

« Cette transformation est implicite dans les aventures du théâtre expérimental des années 60 et suivantes. Elle commence avec l’émancipation du primat du texte et de la littérature, la contestation de la séparation entre acteurs et spectateurs et l’abolition de la distinction entre scène et réalité. Tout ceci amène à trouver l’essence du théâtre dans l’exposition d’un événement qui survient ici et maintenant, dans la fragrance du fait qu’il se passe sous nos yeux. À première vue, cette expérience du présent ressenti comme quelque chose de plus intense et de plus ardent que l’expérimentation du théâtre traditionnel, qui est imitation de l’action et non véritable action, a l’air de nous introduire dans une dimension caractérisée par une plus grande spiritualité et vitalité. (…) en effet, à la différence de la représentation théâtrale traditionnelle, la performance ambitionne d’être un événement unique, irrémédiable, irrévocable, non renouvelable, et c’est justement la raison pour laquelle elle exige son enregistrement, sa reproduction photographique, son tournage cinématographique ou vidéo, bref, sa transformation en images, en documents, en matériaux, en objets à archiver et à conserver. Sous cet angle, le meilleur exemple est constitué par le passage du plus représentatif des théoriciens de la performance, Richard Schechner, d’une conception de la scène comme actualizing, actuation et acte de présentation, à une idée de l’activité théâtrale comme restoration, récupération de comportements passés, manipulations et transmission d’un héritage. Il semble que plus l’instantanéité, l’immédiateté et l’aspect factuel sont soulignés, et plus on tend à une attitude conservatrice, ordonnatrice et témoignante. » 

(Mario Perniola, Le Sex-Appeal de l’inorganique, Paris, Éditions Léo Scheer, coll. Lignes, 2003, p. 224.)

 

(François Pluchart : « La photo, le film, la vidéo – comme autrefois la peinture et le dessin – ont d’abord pour fonction de conserver la trace d’un fait plastique : ils agissent en tant que constats, mais ils constituent dans la plupart des cas le travail lui-même. Gina Pane ou Michel Journiac, Urs Lüthi ou Henri Maccheroni produisent des oeuvres corporelles qui sont uniquement un travail photographique. Il faut donc les considérer comme telles et comme substitut d’une peinture qui s’abîme le plus souvent dans la manipulation de recettes éprouvées. »

(François Pluchart, L’Art corporel, Paris, Limage 2, 1983, p. 46-47)

 

(Chantal Pontbriand : « La littéralité du temps et de l’espace est une composante de base. Une performance dure souvent le temps du processus qui la sous-tend […] La plupart du temps, la performance est situationnelle et prend son essor dans un lieu et un temps précis. » 

« […] Mais la performance est plus. […] Elle est une carte, une écriture qui se déchiffre dans l’immédiat, dans le présent, dans la situation présente, une confrontation avec le spectateur. »

(Chantal Pontbriand, « Introduction : notion(s) de performance », in A. A. Bronson, P. Gale, Performing by Artists, Toronto, Art Metropole, 1979, p. 15-16 et 22)

 

(Pierre Restany : « As of 1971, Kaprow crossed the Rubicon: He based his research on the relationships between individuals. His work changed from ‘multimedia’ to ‘intermedia’. He abandoned the obsolete term, ‘happening’, in favor of the intentionally neutral term ‘activity’. Since then, he has carried out 40 activities, following a fixed operational scheme. The activity is the object of the written ‘script’ containing all operational indications and premises. »

(Pierre Restany, « From Happening to Activity », Domus, no.566, January 1977, p.52.)

 

(Walter Robinson : « By taking up performance, an artist was refusing to join an elite art profession that purveys esoteric luxury items to select clients » But, he continued, «  For many of the performers this attitude turned out to be a matter of professional strategy : with options in painting and sculpture in the early ‘70’s apparently closed off, performance served as a fast and effective way of carving out a personnal niche in the art system. »

(Walter Robinson, « Art + Life = Artist’s Performances », Art in America (January 1981), p. 13)

 

(Carolee Schneemann : « I don’t work with « chance methods » because « method » does not assume evidence of the senses; chance is a depth run on intent, and I keep it open, « formless. » « Chance method » is a contrary process for my needs and a semantic contradiction which carries seeds of its own exhaustion in its hand clasp of chance-to-method. Method as orderly procedure, way of classification, arrangement – like a bag into which gestalten insight allows chance to pour; what might happen, possibility, unpredicable agent, unknown forces… so corralled, netted, become a closing in. Depth run of it – « chance, » is way of necessity to surface and tentacled riches are not captured by method. 

Process with material/image leads exploratively, spontaneously. Chance, recognition and insistence with discoveries is field of action. Visual-kinesthesic sources are not abstract-theorethical conceptions for my process. In bearing. Slug and release – fling it out and pull in the nets; expect to be surprised. » 

(see Dan Cameron and Michael Rowe, « Interview with Carolee Schneemann », NYC, 27 February 1980, BCJP; Schneemann, More Than Meat Joy, Documentext, McPherson & Co., NYC, p. 18.)

 

(Carolee Schneemann : « The force of a performance is necessarily more aggressive and immediate in its effect –  it is projective. The steady exploration and repeated viewing which the eyes is required to make with my painting-contructions is reversed in the performance situation where the spectatator is overwhelmed with changing recognitions, carried emotionally by a flux of evocative actions and led or held by the specific time sequence which marks the duration of a performance. » (id.)

 

(Rebecca Schneider : « Nous sommes donc habitués à penser que la performance qu’elle échappe à toute saisie parce qu’elle est (re) composée en temps réel, et nous pouvons ainsi dire aisément d’un film ou d’une photographie qu’il s’agit d’un document du direct et non la performance en soi […]… »

(Rebecca Schneider, Point and Shoot – Performance et photographie, Montréal, Dazibao, 2005, p. 63)

 

(Willoughby Sharp : « L’artiste est le sujet et l’objet de l’action. Généralement la performance est exécutée dans l’intimité de l’atelier. Les travaux individuels sont pour la plupart communiqués au public par le biais du puissant langage visuel des photographies, films, vidéos et d’autres médias, tous avec une forte immédiateté d’impact. »

« La plupart des travaux corporels présentés à travers des photographies fixes montrent différentes vues d’un processus en cours et approchent l’effet des films. Mais même si une seule photo est délivrée pour le travail, on reste conscient d’un processus continu. »

(Willoughby Sharp, « Body Works: A Pre-critical, non Definitive Survey of Very Recent Works Using the Human Body or Parts Thereof », Avalanche, n° 1, automne 1970, p. 14 et p. 16)

 

(Anne Tronche : « Actions, rituels, performances élaboraient souterrainement une nouvelle histoire de la conscience, se situant en proximité des thèses défendues par l’anti-psychiatrie. La volonté d’une émancipation expérimentale, telle qu’elle s’exprimait dans cette omniprésence du corps, exacerbait un sentiment de transgression dont on a peut-être aujourd’hui quelque difficulté à imaginer la force. Se trouver au tournant d’un corridor confronté au corps dénudé de l’artiste (Vito Acconci lors d’une performance chez Ileana Sonnabend, 1972), imaginer la douleur physique d’un corps allongé sur des barres de métal sous lesquelles brûlent des bougies (Gina Pane lors de l’action Autoportrait(s) présentée à la galerie Stadler, 1973), contempler le corps d’un homme nu dans une cage structurée par des barres de néons (Piège pour un voyeur, par Michel Journiac, 1969, galerie Martin-Malburet), respirer le sang frais d’une bête dépecée par les Actionnistes viennois dans un climat de rite païen (Action, FIAC, 1975) obligeaient bien évidemment à se poser la question de la situation de l’art dans la société et, plus radicalement, à s’interroger sur sa propre capacité à comprendre ce langage court-circuitant toutes les médiations, à admettre également que derrière ces actes auto-réflexifs indifférents aux critères de goût et de plaisir esthétique se profilait un nouvel usage de la communication. […] Demeurée longtemps une discipline ‘‘imprévisible’’ et marginale, la performance ne saurait, malgré l’augmentation exponentielle des créateurs qui s’intéressent à son énergie motrice, devenir une discipline comme une autre. Employé pour accompagner différents types de mises en scène données en public, le terme de ‘‘performance artistique’’ nécessite plus que jamais un sérieux travail d’analyse, de mise en forme chronologique pour en éclairer les thématiques distinctes. »

(Anne Tronche, « Préface », in Janig Bégoc, Nathalie Boulouch & Elvan Zabunyan, La Performance. Entre archives et pratiques contemporaines, Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes & Archives de la critique d’art, 2010, p. 9-10.)

 

(Victor Turner : « Essentiellement, la communauté est une relation entre des individus concrets, historiques, idiosyncratiques. Ces individus ne sont pas répartis en segments, dans des rôles et des statuts, mais sont plutôt en présence les uns des autres… Cette relation est toujours un happening, quelque chose qui survient dans une réciprocité immédiate. »

(Victor Turner, Le Phénomène rituel : structure and contre-structure, Paris, PUF, Coll. « Ethnologies », 1990, p. 127)

 

(Wolf Vostell : « Le public mélange souvent les faits importants : que le happening s’occupe de phénomènes destructeurs de notre époque ne signifie absolument pas que la forme happening soit elle-même destructive. »

(Wolf Vostell, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(Jayne Wark : « Alors que les femmes artistes, critiques, historiennes de l’art convoquent et questionnent les hypothèses intrinsèques et tacites propres aux notions de genre, de sexualité et de créativité prises dans leur sens le plus large, cette nouvelle conscience féministe trouve en Amérique du Nord sa manifestation la plus remarquable dans la pratique de la performance. En effet, les relations entre le féminisme et la performance depuis les années 70 sont telles qu’il est impossible d’évoquer le premier sans référence à la seconde. »

(Jayne Wark, « Introduction », in Radical Gestures, Feminism and Performance Art in North America, Montreal & Kingston, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2006, p. 3.)

 

(Tracy Warr : « En tant que document, la photographie présuppose généralement l’authenticité et fait autorité. Des performances longues et complexes impliquant la participation du public sont réduites à une seule image – la  ‘‘bonne’’ image du point de vue de l’éditeur – reproduite maintes fois dans les ouvrages. »

(Tracy Warr, « Image as Icon: Recognising the Enigma », in Art, Lies and Videotape: Exposing Performance, Liverpool, Tate Liverpool, 2003, p. 32.)

 

(Allen S. Weiss : « Le procédé qui fait une totalité, toutefois ouverte, d’une telle multiplicité est le collage ou le montage, véritable clé de l’esthétique moderniste. Mais l’assimilation et la juxtaposition de tels fragments dans une oeuvre n’implique pas seulement le jeu d’une inter-textualité barthésienne, cette profondeur infinie de correspondances, d’interférences et de parasites qui décomposent toute combinatoire structuraliste en un plaisir textuel ; il s’agit, en outre, de l’éclatement de l’oeuvre même dans une hétérogénéité plastiques d’oeuvres multimedia, mixed-media et intermedia. La « performativité » des gestes  esthétiques, la « prolifération des singularités événementielles » (Daniel Charles, Musiques nomades, Paris Kimé, 1998, p. 227), tiennent lieu de l’ancienne oeuvre. Au coeur de la musique même, la partition se transforme en scénario (p. 103) et le rêve d’un Gesamtkunstwerk est aboli dans un « désoeuvrement visant à la production d’un art informel » (p. 225). Comme le note Cage, décrivant cette confusion des genres, cette équivoque ontologique qu’il a inspirées : « Langages devenant musiques, musiques devenant théâtres ; performances, métamorphoses. » (Empty Words, Middletown, Wesleyan University Press, 1979, p. 65) On peut dire que la ligne directrice de cette musicologie n’est plus le stream-of-consciouness (avec sa logique du désir, ses formes de rêves, ses fantasmes intérieurs, sa gestualité corporelle, ses articulations symboliques) qui a guidé les débuts de l’art moderne, mais un stream-of-existence  (construit par montage ou « cut-up », criblé de hasard, structurel, concret, désarticulé). » 

(Allen S. Weiss, « Le désoeuvrement de la musique », Paris, revue Critique 639-540, août-septembre 2000, 743-751.)

 

(Rosemary Mayer : « For a number of reasons, performance art is most open to elucidation by consideration of the personalities, life experiences, and life styles of the people who do it. Firstly, with performance art there is the immediate, obvious connection between artist and work – the artist as performer. The artist’s physical capacities and appearance partially define the work. Secondly, performance art has almost no inherited, traditional form to come between the artist and his idea. The art ide ais not mediated through canvas and stretchers or the materials of sculpture. The artist and his activities make up the physical presence of the work. Thirdly, some new way of looking at performance art is needed since this kind of art deals with psychology, philosophy, cybernetics, sociology, learning theory, little of which is considered in most present art criticism when it deals with specific works and all of which are as equally if not more intimately connected with the life experiences of the artists concerned than with their experiences from past and contemporary art. It could be said that performance artists develop their ideas through conversation and readings in psychology, philosophy, etc. But when one reads in any of these fields it is the principles and situation most like those one has personally known which influence throught. »

[…] 

(Carl E. Loeffler : Mayer contends that performance art is most explicable by considering the life experience of the artists who produce the work because: 1. the relationship of the artist is to performance as subject-object. 2. the nonexistence of a traditional form. 3. most art criticism is formalist by nature.)

(Rosemary Mayer, « Performance & Experience », Arts Magazine, v. 47, December 1972/January 1973, pp. 33-36. General essay on performance art, the influence of life experiences on the art produced by an artist. Excerpts.)

 

(David Medalla : « I dream of the day when I shall create sculptures that breathe, perspire, cough, laugh, yawn, smirk, wink, pant, dance, walk, crawl… and move among people as shadows move along people. »

(David Medalla, Sign 1, no. 8, juin-juillet 1965, repris dans le catalogue When Attitudes Become Form (Kunsthalle, Berne, 1969, non paginé)

 

(Herbert Molderings : « It is certainly not accidental that Happenings and action art, the forerunners of the performance movement, started around 1960 when television began to play a major role in everyday life. »

(Herbert Molderings, « Life is no Performance : Performance by Jochen Gerz », in The Art of Performance. A Critical Anthology, edited by Gregory Battcock and Robert Nickas, NYC, E.P. Dutton, 1984.)

 

(Kathy O’Dell : « Une réponse haptique inconsciente est suscitée quand le spectateur touche une photographie prise par un photographe qui toucha le déclencheur de l’appareil alors que le ‘‘performer’’ touchait sa peau, utilisant  son corps à la fois comme un moyen de contact et un matériau de la performance. Cette chaîne d’espériences, fonctionnant rétrospectivement, enchaîne le spectateur au photographe/spectateur mais aussi le ‘‘performer’’ en une complicité métaphorique. »

(Kathy O’Dell, Contract with the Skin. Masochism Performance Art and the 1970s, Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 1998, p. 14)

 

(Brian O’Doherty : « It was with Abstract Expressionism that critics firts began consistently describing artists as ‘performers’… and grading them according to ‘performance’. With the emphasis on ‘gesture’ and ‘action’ one began to get double image of what was hailed as the single ultimate image in art : the picture and behind it, the artist, like some gesticulating ghostly presence. »

(Brian O’Doherty, « Looking at the Artist as Performer », in Object and Idea : An Art Critic’s Journal 1961-1967, NYC, Simon & Schuster, 1967), p. 227 (Originally written in August 1964).

 

(Orlan : «  O : Pour moi, la performance est un cadre vide dans lequel les pratiques artistiques viennent se questionner. Contrairement à ce que certains pensent, la performance n’est pas un style voué à l’éphémère et qui serait identifié aux années 70. Actuellement, les performances sont présentes partout, dans toutes les générations, et également dans les écoles des beaux-arts.

C’est un endroit qui s’est inventé peu à peu et il a pris des aspects différents. L’art-performance s’est déjà différencié de la performance physique. Plusieurs catégories de performance sont apparues : la performance vidéo, la performance danse, la performance son… On pourrait dire que la performance est une tendance artistique influencée par toutes ces pratiques. Aussi échappe-t-elle à toute saisie et à toute définition. Comme c’est le cas généralement pour d’autres arts, il y a toujours une part de résonance avec la société dans laquelle elle s’inscrit. Or la société est toujours en mouvement, aux niveaux politique, intellectuel, social tout comme au niveau de ses interdits, ce qui ajoute à la difficulté et qui explique aussi ses évolutions. Dans cette nouvelle pratique artistique intervient le médium corps, ce qui facilite l’identification car tout le monde a un corps. Cela engendre une très forte intensité avec le public, c’est ce qui en fait la qualité. Toutefois cette qualité diffère de celle rencontrée habituellement du théâtre, auquel on l’assimile parfois. Il peut y avoir des porosités entre ces deux arts, des passages, des liens. Des différences sont cependant perceptibles. Les performances peuvent avoir lieu sur une scène, dans une salle, dans la rue, mais les performers ne jouent pas un texte appris et restitué, ils sont plutôt dans une sorte de mise en jeu d’eux-mêmes. Les spectateurs n’assistent pas à un faux drame qui se jouerait devant eux. Dans le cas de la performance, il s’agit d’un vrai drame qui se vit à cet instant-là. Donc les performers, ce ne sont plus des acteurs, mais bien des actants

S.R. : Considérez-vous qu’il s’agit d’un ‘‘art-action’’ ?

O. : On peut dire ‘‘quelque chose se passe’’ et c’est une action. Mais est-ce que toutes les performances sont des performances d’action ? Effectivement je suis passée par quelque chose qui s’appelle ‘‘action’’ dans mon travail. J’ai fait beaucoup d’actions qui se sont passées effectivement dans le tissu urbain : les actions de rue. J’ai appelé toute une série de mes oeuvres Action ORLAN-CORPS. A l’intérieur de ses Actions ORLAN se trouvent aussi les ‘‘Corps-sculptures’’. » 

[corps-sculptures : « j’ai également conçu une série qui s’appelle ‘‘Corps-sculptures’’ où je considérais le corps comme une sculpture et privais mon visage d’identité en le cachant soit par la pose soit par les cheveux ou un masque. » ORLAN cité par Bart de Baere, Sophie Gregoir, Wim Van Mulders, Hubert Besacier et Alain Charre (eds), Orlan MesuRages (1968-2012). Action ORLAN-Corps, Anvers, Éditions du M HKA, 2012, p. 10-11]

(Orlan, « entretien avec Sylvie Roques, mardi 27 novembre 2012 au studio Orlan à Paris », revue Communications, n° 92, 2013, Paris, Seuil, p. 219.)

 

(Gina Pane : « Our entire culture is based on the representation of the body. Performance doesn’t so much annul painting as help out the birth of a new painting based on different explanations and functions of the body in art. »

(Gina Pane, « Wound as a sign », Flash Art, nos 92-93 (oct.-nov. 1979), p. 37.)

 

(Bruno Péquignot : « Ce qui reste d’une performance, c’est a minima un récit, ou un scénario, et au-delà des photos, des films qui attestent que quelque chose s’est produit, mais ces traces […] ne sont pas des ‘‘oeuvres’’. […] Mais étendre la notion de performance à l’ensemble des réalisations des arts vivants fait courir le risque d’en diluer l’intérêt théorique et esthétique et il me semble qu’il vaut mieux ici s’en tenir à ce qui se présente comme tel, quelle que soit la discipline concernée. Certes, il y a des performances en arts vivants, mais tous les spectacles d’art vivant n’en relève pas.  »

(Bruno Péquignot « De la performance dans les arts », revue Communications, n° 92, 2013, Paris, Seuil, p. 11)

 

(Mario Perniola : « …le sex-appeal de l’inorganique est justement le contraire du plaisir : non pas la douleur, mais un effort, une entreprise, un exercice, un entraînement, une performance. De cette façon, non seulement les sons, les espaces, les objets et les mots, mais aussi les actions se libèrent de leur rapport avec l’esprit et avec la vie et deviennent des choses qui sentent et qui sont senties.

« Cette transformation est implicite dans les aventures du théâtre expérimental des années 60 et suivantes. Elle commence avec l’émancipation du primat du texte et de la littérature, la contestation de la séparation entre acteurs et spectateurs et l’abolition de la distinction entre scène et réalité. Tout ceci amène à trouver l’essence du théâtre dans l’exposition d’un événement qui survient ici et maintenant, dans la fragrance du fait qu’il se passe sous nos yeux. À première vue, cette expérience du présent ressenti comme quelque chose de plus intense et de plus ardent que l’expérimentation du théâtre traditionnel, qui est imitation de l’action et non véritable action, a l’air de nous introduire dans une dimension caractérisée par une plus grande spiritualité et vitalité. (…) en effet, à la différence de la représentation théâtrale traditionnelle, la performance ambitionne d’être un événement unique, irrémédiable, irrévocable, non renouvelable, et c’est justement la raison pour laquelle elle exige son enregistrement, sa reproduction photographique, son tournage cinématographique ou vidéo, bref, sa transformation en images, en documents, en matériaux, en objets à archiver et à conserver. Sous cet angle, le meilleur exemple est constitué par le passage du plus représentatif des théoriciens de la performance, Richard Schechner, d’une conception de la scène comme actualizing, actuation et acte de présentation, à une idée de l’activité théâtrale comme restoration, récupération de comportements passés, manipulations et transmission d’un héritage. Il semble que plus l’instantanéité, l’immédiateté et l’aspect factuel sont soulignés, et plus on tend à une attitude conservatrice, ordonnatrice et témoignante. » 

(Mario Perniola, Le Sex-Appeal de l’inorganique, Paris, Éditions Léo Scheer, coll. Lignes, 2003, p. 224.)

 

(François Pluchart : « La photo, le film, la vidéo – comme autrefois la peinture et le dessin – ont d’abord pour fonction de conserver la trace d’un fait plastique : ils agissent en tant que constats, mais ils constituent dans la plupart des cas le travail lui-même. Gina Pane ou Michel Journiac, Urs Lüthi ou Henri Maccheroni produisent des oeuvres corporelles qui sont uniquement un travail photographique. Il faut donc les considérer comme telles et comme substitut d’une peinture qui s’abîme le plus souvent dans la manipulation de recettes éprouvées. »

(François Pluchart, L’Art corporel, Paris, Limage 2, 1983, p. 46-47)

 

(Chantal Pontbriand : « La littéralité du temps et de l’espace est une composante de base. Une performance dure souvent le temps du processus qui la sous-tend […] La plupart du temps, la performance est situationnelle et prend son essor dans un lieu et un temps précis. » 

« […] Mais la performance est plus. […] Elle est une carte, une écriture qui se déchiffre dans l’immédiat, dans le présent, dans la situation présente, une confrontation avec le spectateur. »

(Chantal Pontbriand, « Introduction : notion(s) de performance », in A. A. Bronson, P. Gale, Performing by Artists, Toronto, Art Metropole, 1979, p. 15-16 et 22)

 

(Pierre Restany : « As of 1971, Kaprow crossed the Rubicon: He based his research on the relationships between individuals. His work changed from ‘multimedia’ to ‘intermedia’. He abandoned the obsolete term, ‘happening’, in favor of the intentionally neutral term ‘activity’. Since then, he has carried out 40 activities, following a fixed operational scheme. The activity is the object of the written ‘script’ containing all operational indications and premises. »

(Pierre Restany, « From Happening to Activity », Domus, no.566, January 1977, p.52.)

 

(Walter Robinson : « By taking up performance, an artist was refusing to join an elite art profession that purveys esoteric luxury items to select clients » But, he continued, «  For many of the performers this attitude turned out to be a matter of professional strategy : with options in painting and sculpture in the early ‘70’s apparently closed off, performance served as a fast and effective way of carving out a personnal niche in the art system. »

(Walter Robinson, « Art + Life = Artist’s Performances », Art in America (January 1981), p. 13)

 

(Carolee Schneemann : « I don’t work with « chance methods » because « method » does not assume evidence of the senses; chance is a depth run on intent, and I keep it open, « formless. » « Chance method » is a contrary process for my needs and a semantic contradiction which carries seeds of its own exhaustion in its hand clasp of chance-to-method. Method as orderly procedure, way of classification, arrangement – like a bag into which gestalten insight allows chance to pour; what might happen, possibility, unpredicable agent, unknown forces… so corralled, netted, become a closing in. Depth run of it – « chance, » is way of necessity to surface and tentacled riches are not captured by method. 

Process with material/image leads exploratively, spontaneously. Chance, recognition and insistence with discoveries is field of action. Visual-kinesthesic sources are not abstract-theorethical conceptions for my process. In bearing. Slug and release – fling it out and pull in the nets; expect to be surprised. » 

(see Dan Cameron and Michael Rowe, « Interview with Carolee Schneemann », NYC, 27 February 1980, BCJP; Schneemann, More Than Meat Joy, Documentext, McPherson & Co., NYC, p. 18.)

 

(Carolee Schneemann : « The force of a performance is necessarily more aggressive and immediate in its effect –  it is projective. The steady exploration and repeated viewing which the eyes is required to make with my painting-contructions is reversed in the performance situation where the spectatator is overwhelmed with changing recognitions, carried emotionally by a flux of evocative actions and led or held by the specific time sequence which marks the duration of a performance. » (id.)

 

(Rebecca Schneider : « Nous sommes donc habitués à penser que la performance qu’elle échappe à toute saisie parce qu’elle est (re) composée en temps réel, et nous pouvons ainsi dire aisément d’un film ou d’une photographie qu’il s’agit d’un document du direct et non la performance en soi […]… »

(Rebecca Schneider, Point and Shoot – Performance et photographie, Montréal, Dazibao, 2005, p. 63)

 

(Willoughby Sharp : « L’artiste est le sujet et l’objet de l’action. Généralement la performance est exécutée dans l’intimité de l’atelier. Les travaux individuels sont pour la plupart communiqués au public par le biais du puissant langage visuel des photographies, films, vidéos et d’autres médias, tous avec une forte immédiateté d’impact. »

« La plupart des travaux corporels présentés à travers des photographies fixes montrent différentes vues d’un processus en cours et approchent l’effet des films. Mais même si une seule photo est délivrée pour le travail, on reste conscient d’un processus continu. »

(Willoughby Sharp, « Body Works: A Pre-critical, non Definitive Survey of Very Recent Works Using the Human Body or Parts Thereof », Avalanche, n° 1, automne 1970, p. 14 et p. 16)

 

(Anne Tronche : « Actions, rituels, performances élaboraient souterrainement une nouvelle histoire de la conscience, se situant en proximité des thèses défendues par l’anti-psychiatrie. La volonté d’une émancipation expérimentale, telle qu’elle s’exprimait dans cette omniprésence du corps, exacerbait un sentiment de transgression dont on a peut-être aujourd’hui quelque difficulté à imaginer la force. Se trouver au tournant d’un corridor confronté au corps dénudé de l’artiste (Vito Acconci lors d’une performance chez Ileana Sonnabend, 1972), imaginer la douleur physique d’un corps allongé sur des barres de métal sous lesquelles brûlent des bougies (Gina Pane lors de l’action Autoportrait(s) présentée à la galerie Stadler, 1973), contempler le corps d’un homme nu dans une cage structurée par des barres de néons (Piège pour un voyeur, par Michel Journiac, 1969, galerie Martin-Malburet), respirer le sang frais d’une bête dépecée par les Actionnistes viennois dans un climat de rite païen (Action, FIAC, 1975) obligeaient bien évidemment à se poser la question de la situation de l’art dans la société et, plus radicalement, à s’interroger sur sa propre capacité à comprendre ce langage court-circuitant toutes les médiations, à admettre également que derrière ces actes auto-réflexifs indifférents aux critères de goût et de plaisir esthétique se profilait un nouvel usage de la communication. […] Demeurée longtemps une discipline ‘‘imprévisible’’ et marginale, la performance ne saurait, malgré l’augmentation exponentielle des créateurs qui s’intéressent à son énergie motrice, devenir une discipline comme une autre. Employé pour accompagner différents types de mises en scène données en public, le terme de ‘‘performance artistique’’ nécessite plus que jamais un sérieux travail d’analyse, de mise en forme chronologique pour en éclairer les thématiques distinctes. »

(Anne Tronche, « Préface », in Janig Bégoc, Nathalie Boulouch & Elvan Zabunyan, La Performance. Entre archives et pratiques contemporaines, Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes & Archives de la critique d’art, 2010, p. 9-10.)

 

(Victor Turner : « Essentiellement, la communauté est une relation entre des individus concrets, historiques, idiosyncratiques. Ces individus ne sont pas répartis en segments, dans des rôles et des statuts, mais sont plutôt en présence les uns des autres… Cette relation est toujours un happening, quelque chose qui survient dans une réciprocité immédiate. »

(Victor Turner, Le Phénomène rituel : structure and contre-structure, Paris, PUF, Coll. « Ethnologies », 1990, p. 127)

 

(Wolf Vostell : « Le public mélange souvent les faits importants : que le happening s’occupe de phénomènes destructeurs de notre époque ne signifie absolument pas que la forme happening soit elle-même destructive. »

(Wolf Vostell, in Parti-pris sur le happening, Rouen, Derrière la salle de bains, 1999, première publication : Identités n° 13-14 février 1966)

 

(Jayne Wark : « Alors que les femmes artistes, critiques, historiennes de l’art convoquent et questionnent les hypothèses intrinsèques et tacites propres aux notions de genre, de sexualité et de créativité prises dans leur sens le plus large, cette nouvelle conscience féministe trouve en Amérique du Nord sa manifestation la plus remarquable dans la pratique de la performance. En effet, les relations entre le féminisme et la performance depuis les années 70 sont telles qu’il est impossible d’évoquer le premier sans référence à la seconde. »

(Jayne Wark, « Introduction », in Radical Gestures, Feminism and Performance Art in North America, Montreal & Kingston, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2006, p. 3.)

 

(Tracy Warr : « En tant que document, la photographie présuppose généralement l’authenticité et fait autorité. Des performances longues et complexes impliquant la participation du public sont réduites à une seule image – la  ‘‘bonne’’ image du point de vue de l’éditeur – reproduite maintes fois dans les ouvrages. »

(Tracy Warr, « Image as Icon: Recognising the Enigma », in Art, Lies and Videotape: Exposing Performance, Liverpool, Tate Liverpool, 2003, p. 32.)

 

(Allen S. Weiss : « Le procédé qui fait une totalité, toutefois ouverte, d’une telle multiplicité est le collage ou le montage, véritable clé de l’esthétique moderniste. Mais l’assimilation et la juxtaposition de tels fragments dans une oeuvre n’implique pas seulement le jeu d’une inter-textualité barthésienne, cette profondeur infinie de correspondances, d’interférences et de parasites qui décomposent toute combinatoire structuraliste en un plaisir textuel ; il s’agit, en outre, de l’éclatement de l’oeuvre même dans une hétérogénéité plastiques d’oeuvres multimedia, mixed-media et intermedia. La « performativité » des gestes  esthétiques, la « prolifération des singularités événementielles » (Daniel Charles, Musiques nomades, Paris Kimé, 1998, p. 227), tiennent lieu de l’ancienne oeuvre. Au coeur de la musique même, la partition se transforme en scénario (p. 103) et le rêve d’un Gesamtkunstwerk est aboli dans un « désoeuvrement visant à la production d’un art informel » (p. 225). Comme le note Cage, décrivant cette confusion des genres, cette équivoque ontologique qu’il a inspirées : « Langages devenant musiques, musiques devenant théâtres ; performances, métamorphoses. » (Empty Words, Middletown, Wesleyan University Press, 1979, p. 65) On peut dire que la ligne directrice de cette musicologie n’est plus le stream-of-consciouness (avec sa logique du désir, ses formes de rêves, ses fantasmes intérieurs, sa gestualité corporelle, ses articulations symboliques) qui a guidé les débuts de l’art moderne, mais un stream-of-existence  (construit par montage ou « cut-up », criblé de hasard, structurel, concret, désarticulé). » 

(Allen S. Weiss, « Le désoeuvrement de la musique », Paris, revue Critique 639-540, août-septembre 2000, 743-751.)

Publié dans Textes-Arts

Commenter cet article