Nauman Bruce

Publié le par Olivier Lussac

Bruce Nauman's films and videotapes from the 1960s and '70s are recognized as among the most influential and innovative in contemporary art.
Twenty-nine historical works by Nauman have been newly restored through EAI's Preservation Program.

Bruce Nauman is one of most important and influential figures in contemporary art. His seminal films and videotapes from the 1960s and '70s are among the most innovative contributions to media art. In these conceptual works, Nauman uses his body as an art object, executing repetitive performance actions in his studio. Exploiting the phenomenology of the medium, including its immediacy, space, and intimacy, his real-time gestures investigate the very process of making art.

Thighing (Blue)  1967, 10 min, color, sound, 16 mm film
Art Make-Up  1967-68, 40 min, color, silent, 16 mm film
    No. 1, White  1967, 10 min, color, silent, 16 mm film
    No. 2, Pink  1967-68, 10 min, color, silent, 16 mm film
    No. 3, Green  1967-68, 10 min, color, sound, 16 mm film
    No. 4, Black  1967-68, 10 min, color, sound, 16 mm film
Bouncing Two Balls Between the Floor and Ceiling with Changing Rhythms  1967-68, 10 min, b&w, sound, 16 mm film
Dance or Exercise on the Perimeter of a Square (Square Dance)  1967-68, 10 min, b&w, sound, 16 mm film
Playing A Note on the Violin While I Walk Around the Studio  1967-68, 10 min, b&w, sound, 16 mm film
Violin Film # 1 (Playing The Violin As Fast As I Can)  1967-68, 10:54 min., b&w, sound, 16 mm film
Walking in an Exaggerated Manner Around the Perimeter of a Square  1967-68, 10 min, b&w, silent, 16 mm film
Bouncing in the Corner No. 1  1968, 60 min, b&w, sound
Flesh to White to Black to Flesh  1968, 51 min, b&w, sound
Pinchneck  1968, 2 min, color, silent, 16 mm film
Slow Angle Walk (Beckett Walk)  1968, 60 min, b&w, sound
Stamping in the Studio  1968, 62 min, b&w, sound
Walk with Contrapposto  1968, 60 min, b&w, sound
Wall-Floor Positions  1968, 60 min, b&w, sound
Black Balls  1969, 8 min, b&w, silent, 16 mm film
Bouncing Balls  1969, 9 min, b&w, silent, 16 mm film
Bouncing in the Corner, No. 2: Upside
 Down  1969, 60 min, b&w, sound
Gauze  1969, 8 min, b&w, silent, 16 mm film
Lip Sync  1969, 57 min, b&w, sound
Manipulating a Fluorescent Tube  1969, 62 min, b&w, sound
Pacing Upside Down  1969, 56 min, b&w, sound
Pulling Mouth  1969, 8 min, b&w, silent, 16 mm film
Revolving Upside Down  1969, 61 min, b&w, sound
Violin Tuned D.E.A.D.  1969, 60 min, b&w, sound
Elke Allowing the Floor to Rise Up Over Her, Face Up  1973, 39 min, color, sound
Tony Sinking into the Floor, Face Up, and Face Down  1973, 60 min, color, sound

Bruce Nauman. New York: Distributed Art Publishers, in association with Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 1994. Texts by Neal Benezra, Kathy Halbreich, Paul Schimmel, and Robert Storr. Including a catalogue raisonné edited by Joan Simon.
Bruce Nauman: Image/Text, 1966 - 1996. London: Hayward Gallery, 1998. Texts by François Albera, Michele De Angelus, Christine van Assche, Chris Dercon, Vincent Labaume, Jean-Charles Masséra, Tony Oursler, Christina Ricupero, Willoughby Sharp, Joan Simon, Marcia Tucker, and Gijs van Tuyl.

Bruce Nauman: Work from 1965 to 1972. Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1972. Texts by Jane Livingston and Marcia Tucker.

Bruggen, Coosje van. Bruce Nauman. New York: Rizzoli, 1988.
Hoffmann, Christine, ed. Bruce Nauman: Interviews, 1967 - 1988. Amsterdam: Verlag der Kunst, 1996.

Bruce Nauman
Born in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Bruce Nauman studied mathematics and physics at the University of Wisconsin before receiving an MFA from the University of California at Davis in 1966. By the late 60s Nauman had earned a reputation as a conceptual pioneer in the field of sculpture and his works were included in the  groundbreaking exhibitions, Nine at Castelli (1968) and Anti-Illusion (1969). He began working in film with Robert Nelson and William Allen while teaching at the San Francisco Art Institute. He produced his first videotapes in 1968, describing the transition from film to video thus:  "With the films I would work over an idea until there was something that I  wanted to do, then I would rent the equipment for a day or two. So I was more likely to have a specific idea of what I wanted to  do. With the videotapes, I had the equipment in the  studio for almost a year; I could make test tapes and look at them, watch myself on the monitor or have  somebody else there to help. Lots of times I would do a whole performance or tape a whole hour and then change it. I don't think I would ever edit but I would redo the whole thing if I didn't like it." Using his body to explore the limits of everday situations, Nauman explored video as a theatrical stage and a surveillance device within an installation context, influenced by the experimental work of Merce Cunningham, Meredith Monk, La Monte Young, Steve Reich, and Phillip Glass.

Publié dans Biographies

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